women writers exhibit books imageExhibit on view through April 4, 2014

Chin Ying Asian Library, Sun Yat Sen Memorial Hall

Curated by Anastasia Chiu

To mark Women’s History Month, the Asian Collection Highlights exhibit is showcasing literature anthologies of works by woman writers in East Asia. Covering multiple genres of literature from 1600 through the 1990’s, the anthologies in this exhibit are a small sample of the wealth of works in the Chin Ying Asian Library that observe and analyze the growth and development of women’s voices and representation in the modern international context.

As with all Asian Collection Highlights exhibits, items on display may be removed from the display case upon request and perused in-library or checked out. Previous installations of the Asian Collection Highlights Exhibit have included: Literary Classics and Visual Arts in Japan, the Wang Guanying Gift, the Soong Sisters (for the 2013 observance of Women’s History Month), and Buddhist Art in East Asia.

An Exhibition of Botanical Specimens from the Mary Garden at St. John’s
February 13 – March 5, 2014
St. Augustine Hall 4th Floor
St. John’s University

Sacred Botany; Seed, Leaf, Flower in the Healing ArtsHidden within the pages of illuminated manuscripts, books of hours and breviaries, intricately illustrated botanical specimens have formed an integral part of medieval manuscripts and religious iconography and later, the Renaissance aesthetics. They illustrate botanical symbolism and its Christian orientation and enhance the visual beauty of a work on paper.

For Mariology students (THEO 3215) of Prof. Andrea Florendo as cross-curricular Mary Gardeners, they constitute intriguing footnotes to the larger but related subjects of art, botany & theology. Their Academic Service- Learning and participation in Learning Communities events lead in part to artistic documentation and record-keeping of botanical specimens from the Mary Garden at St. John’s habitat, and preserved in a herbarium at St. Albert’s Hall for research purposes. Several works from the Library’s Special Collections showcase images of plants that are used to sustain not only the body, but the mind and spirit as well.

Exhibit on ViewExhibit photo - Japanese lit classics

Chin Ying Asian Library, Sun Yat Sen Memorial Hall

November 21, 2013 – February 1, 2014

Curated by Anastasia Chiu

This installation of Asian Collection Highlights illuminates the cornucopia of Japanese literary classics and scholarly works on literature in the Chin Ying Asian Library on the Queens campus. The exhibition explores multiple genres of Japanese literature and multiple visual art forms across a wide range of cultural epochs, drawing on significant literary classics from the seventh century through the modern era. It includes notable English translations, Japanese-language source texts, and significant works of scholarly criticism with reproduced paintings and prints. Previous installations of the Asian Collection Highlights have included: Buddhist Art in East Asia, The Soong Sisters, and The Wang Guanying Gift.

Items in the exhibit are available for perusal in the library.

History of DLIS - 75 YearsExhibition on View

November 7, 2013 – December 13, 2013

St. Augustine Hall – 4th Floor

(outside the DLIS office)

In celebration of 75 years since the founding of the Division of Library and Information Science, an exhibition of materials from the University Archives illustrates the history of the program. Included are reproductions of photographs of faculty, students, and events over the years, early advertisements and a copy of a diploma from when the Library Science program was part of the Teachers College at the St. John’s Brooklyn campus.

For more information about the history of St. John’s University, please contact the University Archives at archives@stjohns.edu or 718-990-1465.

 

Original Leaves from Famous Books

Armenian 1121 A_1

Armenian Manuscript Bible, 1121 A.D. One Leaf. Original Leaves from Famous Bibles, 1121 A.D. – 1935 A.D. Collection assembled by Otto F. Ege. St. John’s University Archives and Special Collections.

1122 A.D. – 1935 A.D.

and

Original Leaves from Famous Bibles

1115 A.D. – 1935 A.D.

Selections from collections assembled by Otto F. Ege

 
On view September 18 – October 11, 2013
 
St. John’s University Libraries
St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor
 
For more information or to conduct research with these collections,
please contact the University Archives and Special Collections
at archives@stjohns.edu or 718-990-1465.

Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

Manumission Letter, 1784, St. John's University Special Collections

Manumission letter written by Joshua Pigman and James Argent of Frederick County State Maryland freeing two slaves, James and Frances, once they turn 21 years old. May 22, 1784.

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor

February 15 – March 15, 2013

Co-curated by Megan Margino and Sharell Walker

The St. John’s University Special Collections presents an exhibition commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Within Special Collections are a variety of primary and secondary documents related to slavery, the Civil War, and the Emancipation Proclamation. Included in this display are reproductions of original documents in Special Collections such as hand-written letters and documents from people such as Vice President Hannibal Hamlin and other notable figures of the era. There are also rare and first edition books that contain unique perspectives on the historical events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation.

These documents are available for research by appointment in the University Archives and Special Collections. To make an appointment, please call (718) 990-1465 or email archives@stjohns.edu.

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd FloorSparks and Sequoya

January 14 – February 12, 2013

Sparks was the oldest literary magazine at St. John’s, which ran for only a short time, from 1891-1897. It was formed when students from the Sparks Literary Society began writing class pamphlets. Upon the success of this pamphlet and encouragement from their faculty advisor, Father McCormick, they began the Sparks literary magazine. The earliest issues were handwritten, while later issues were printed. In addition to editing this early publication, the society dedicated themselves to the study of elocution, composition, and debate. The name Sparks was derived from “the fact that the pamphlet contained little offshoots from the flame of knowledge then so fervent and bright in the minds of many of their class.” By 1897, Sparks Literary Society had raised enough funds for a furnished meeting and reading room and small library.

Sequoya is the second-oldest and longest-running student-published literary magazine at St. John’s University. It was first published in April 1934, at the original St. John’s College campus in Brooklyn. The magazine’s purpose was “to be a free and clear avenue for literary expression”. The magazines featured fiction, poetry, essays, reviews and art, including photography. Over the years, the name of the publication switched between Sequoya and Sequoya Quarterly, and later Sequoya Literary Magazine and Sequoya Literary and Arts Magazine.

Copies of Sparks and Sequoya are housed in the University Archives and are available for research. Please call (718) 990-1465 or email archives@stjohns.edu to make an appointment.