History of DLIS - 75 YearsExhibition on View

November 7, 2013 – December 13, 2013

St. Augustine Hall – 4th Floor

(outside the DLIS office)

In celebration of 75 years since the founding of the Division of Library and Information Science, an exhibition of materials from the University Archives illustrates the history of the program. Included are reproductions of photographs of faculty, students, and events over the years, early advertisements and a copy of a diploma from when the Library Science program was part of the Teachers College at the St. John’s Brooklyn campus.

For more information about the history of St. John’s University, please contact the University Archives at archives@stjohns.edu or 718-990-1465.

 

Original Leaves from Famous Books

Armenian 1121 A_1

Armenian Manuscript Bible, 1121 A.D. One Leaf. Original Leaves from Famous Bibles, 1121 A.D. – 1935 A.D. Collection assembled by Otto F. Ege. St. John’s University Archives and Special Collections.

1122 A.D. – 1935 A.D.

and

Original Leaves from Famous Bibles

1115 A.D. – 1935 A.D.

Selections from collections assembled by Otto F. Ege

 
On view September 18 – October 11, 2013
 
St. John’s University Libraries
St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor
 
For more information or to conduct research with these collections,
please contact the University Archives and Special Collections
at archives@stjohns.edu or 718-990-1465.

Tuesday September 3, 2013

D’Angelo Center, Room 407

3:30pm

Wonder what it was like to be a freshman in the late 19th century, during the Roaring 20’s, at the brink of World War II, or in the midst of the transformative 60’s? Join the St. John’s University Archivist, Dr. Blythe Roveland-Brenton, for a brief presentation with historical photographs and memorabilia.

Vincentian Yearbook, 1960

Vincentian Yearbook, 1960

 

St. John the Baptist Church

St. John the Baptist church, c. 1930 (Image from St. John’s University Archives)

The original St. John the Baptist church was built in 1868 on the plot of land in Brooklyn purchased by the Vincentians where St. John’s College would eventually open in 1870. This small wooden church quickly became too small for the needs of the parish. The cornerstone to the new St. John’s the Baptist church was laid in 1888. It was designed by the famed architect Patrick C. Keely and was based on Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. It took six years to build the stone structure, which was finally dedicated in 1894. Located at 75 Lewis Avenue in Brooklyn, the building still serves the parish of St. John the Baptist.

Exhibition on View April 24 – May 14, 2013rare book title page

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor

Physical books are both texts and artifacts; objects that indicate distinct histories of design, production and use.  Printed works reflect the technologies of paper and parchment making, type casting and printing, and binding – each recording historical developments in book production. They also give clues to past ownership and readership through book plates, inscriptions, marginalia and the occasional ephemera tucked inside their pages (clippings, letters, pressed flowers, etc.). It may well be that the future of the physical book is in peril, replaced by electronic and digitized versions. But books as artifacts of the past will continue to impart other meanings beyond the textual content. 

The twelve books on exhibition – dating from the sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries – were examined and described by graduate students in the Library and Information Science and Public History programs at St. John’s University. The class on special collections librarianship and the history of books and printing was taught by archivist and special collections librarian, Dr. Blythe Roveland-Brenton. The co-curators are: Audrey Belanger, Katie Daniels, Nicole Husbands, Egita Johnson, David McMahon, Janay Meertens-Deans, Kendra Meyer, Christina Orozco, Melissa Perlzweig, Laura Smith, Matthew Weidemann, and Porscha Williams.

Interested in these or other rare books from the University Libraries Special Collections department? Contact us at archives@stjohns.edu to make an appointment.

Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

Manumission Letter, 1784, St. John's University Special Collections

Manumission letter written by Joshua Pigman and James Argent of Frederick County State Maryland freeing two slaves, James and Frances, once they turn 21 years old. May 22, 1784.

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor

February 15 – March 15, 2013

Co-curated by Megan Margino and Sharell Walker

The St. John’s University Special Collections presents an exhibition commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Within Special Collections are a variety of primary and secondary documents related to slavery, the Civil War, and the Emancipation Proclamation. Included in this display are reproductions of original documents in Special Collections such as hand-written letters and documents from people such as Vice President Hannibal Hamlin and other notable figures of the era. There are also rare and first edition books that contain unique perspectives on the historical events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation.

These documents are available for research by appointment in the University Archives and Special Collections. To make an appointment, please call (718) 990-1465 or email archives@stjohns.edu.

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd FloorSparks and Sequoya

January 14 – February 12, 2013

Sparks was the oldest literary magazine at St. John’s, which ran for only a short time, from 1891-1897. It was formed when students from the Sparks Literary Society began writing class pamphlets. Upon the success of this pamphlet and encouragement from their faculty advisor, Father McCormick, they began the Sparks literary magazine. The earliest issues were handwritten, while later issues were printed. In addition to editing this early publication, the society dedicated themselves to the study of elocution, composition, and debate. The name Sparks was derived from “the fact that the pamphlet contained little offshoots from the flame of knowledge then so fervent and bright in the minds of many of their class.” By 1897, Sparks Literary Society had raised enough funds for a furnished meeting and reading room and small library.

Sequoya is the second-oldest and longest-running student-published literary magazine at St. John’s University. It was first published in April 1934, at the original St. John’s College campus in Brooklyn. The magazine’s purpose was “to be a free and clear avenue for literary expression”. The magazines featured fiction, poetry, essays, reviews and art, including photography. Over the years, the name of the publication switched between Sequoya and Sequoya Quarterly, and later Sequoya Literary Magazine and Sequoya Literary and Arts Magazine.

Copies of Sparks and Sequoya are housed in the University Archives and are available for research. Please call (718) 990-1465 or email archives@stjohns.edu to make an appointment.