July 2013


anthony

Summer is a great time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress. Reading, of course, is key to all of these. With this in mind, we asked the librarians at St. John’s about books they will be reading over the next few months. The library has put up a display of the answers we received — it’s on the 3rd floor of St. Augustine Hall. We’ll be posting the individual entries here throughout the summer.

Anthony Todman, an associate professor in the Reference Department, writes:

When I visited the New York Public Library in the Bronx as a youth, I seemed to gravitate towards titles about sports. Without a clue to my eventual career choice, my first stop was Dewey Decimal Classification 796– sports.

          So this summer I will go back to an old habit and read The Outsider: A Memoir, by Jimmy Connors, Earl The Pearl: My Story, by Earl Monroe, and Doc: A Memoir, by Dwight Gooden.  I hope and believe that these stories will transcend the sports of tennis, basketball, and baseball respectively, and give personal and honest assessments about life after the cheering is over, while revealing struggles, sacrifices, and flawed personalities behind the persons who are viewed solely as athletes, entertainers, legends, and sports icons.

Joan 2222222Summer is a great time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress. Reading, of course, is key to all of these. With this in mind, we asked the librarians at St. John’s about books they will be reading over the next few months. The library has put up a display of the answers we received — it’s on the 3rd floor of St. Augustine Hall. We’ll be posting the individual entries here throughout the summer.

Joan D’Andrea, an associate professor in the library and executive director of the university’s Italian Cultural Center, writes:

One book I’m reading this summer is the recently published work Ten Years Later, by Hoda Kotb. This is a book about six people who faced adversity and transformed their lives. They forged through abuse, illness, addiction, grief, and job loss. Because of their battles they changed their lives to begin a journey to a better existence. Their stories, encourage, move and even challenge one to do the same. Great reading.

IMG_2337smallThe Dean of Libraries Theresa Maylone made a presentation about the library at a recent university Departmntal Showcase.  We thought people might find the PowerPoint Dean Maylone used to be of interest. Click: Library Showcase.


IMG_5969 arthurSummer is a great time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress. Reading, of course, is key to all of these. With this in mind, we asked the librarians at St. John’s about books they will be reading over the next few months. The library has put up a display of the answers we received — it’s on the 3rd floor of St. Augustine Hall. We’ll be posting the individual entries here throughout the summer.

Professor Arthur Sherman is the Acquisitions coordinator for the St. John’s University Libraries. He also selects books in a variety of disciplines for inclusion in our collections. Professor Sherman writes:

I‘ve always been interested in the United States Presidential election of 1948. This election was heavily weighted towards foreign policy. This election involved a serious third party, the Progressive Party led by former vice president Henry A. Wallace, who wanted to change the foreign policy of the United States, especially towards the Soviet Union. Was Wallace a naïve dreamer, or possibly a dupe of Communist sympathizers? Or was he a prophet, a man who, if elected, could have changed the course of the post World War II world and eliminated the “Cold War.” In order to begin to understand this election, I plan to read over the summer a book concerning the election, as well as two biographies of Henry A. Wallace: The Loneliest Campaign: Truman’s Victory of 1948, by Irwin Ross; Henry Wallace: His Search for a New World Order, by Graham White and John Maze; and American Dreamer: The Life and Times of Henry A. Wallace, by John C. Culver and John Hyde.

 IMG_5991 lucy 2Summer makes a great time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress.  Reading, of course, is key to all of these.  With this in mind, we asked the librarians at St. John’s about books they will be reading over the next few months.  The library has put up a display of the answers we received—it’s on the 3rd floor of St. Augustine Hall.  We’ll be posting the individual entries here throughout the summer.

Lucy Heckman, an associate professor and head of the Reference Department, writes:

During the summer, I especially enjoy reading books related to history and biography, particularly biographies of presidents including Lincoln and Wilson and of famous Americans, including Alexander Hamilton and Joseph P. Kennedy.   I am interested in British history and biography, including those by Alison Weir and Carolly Erickson.   Among my favorite histories and biographies are: The War of the Roses by Alison Weir; Queen Isabella by Alison Weir; The First Elizabeth by Carolly Erickson;  Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin;  Woodrow Wilson by John Milton Cooper, Jr.; Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow; Mellon: an American Life, by  David Cannadine;  and The Richest Woman in America: Hetty Green in the Gilded Age, by Janet Wallach.  I also enjoy historical fiction most notably the Hillary Mantel books Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. Lately, I am rereading historical fiction by Irving Stone.