resources


The St. John’s Libraries Spotlight Exhibits are monthly exhibits produced by the Circulation Department focused on a particular topic or theme. These exhibits seek to call attention to the resources the Libraries have to offer the St. John’s community and educate the St. John’s community on particular topics and themes. Remember that the books used in the spotlight exhibits can be checked out of the library at any time. Each exhibit has a corresponding page on the “St John’s Libraries Spotlight Exhibits” Campus Guide. The corresponding campus guide pages list the works used in the exhibit, with their call numbers, and provide additional electronic resources related to the topic. The goal of the corresponding campus guide pages then is to preserve, and add to, the resource and topical awareness promoted by the exhibits.

Previous Exhibits:

March 2013 Exhibit – Women’s History Month. This exhibit displays a collection of works on women’s culture and history in celebration of Women’s History Month.

From the African American History Month Exhibit

From the African American History Month Exhibit

February 2013 Exhibit – African American History Month. This exhibit displayed a collection of works on African-Americans and peoples of African descent in celebration of African American History Month.

January 2013 Exhibit – Creative Media. This exhibit displayed a collection of works on forms of creative media in celebration of International Creativity Month.

December 2012 Exhibit – Holiday & Vacation Reading. This exhibit displayed suggested holiday and vacation reading from the libraries’ McNaughton Collection.

November 2012 Exhibit – Native American History and Culture. This exhibit displayed a collection of works related to Native American History and Culture in celebration of Native American Heritage Month.

From the Half the Sky Exhibit

From the Half the Sky Exhibit

October 2012 Exhibit – Half the Sky. This exhibit displayed a collection of works related to prominent themes in Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn’s Half the Sky, a powerful work on the abuses third-world women face that was selected as the 2012-2013 St. John’s Freshman Read book.

September 2012 Exhibit – Comics & Graphic Novels. This exhibit displayed a collection of the libraries’ resources on comics and graphic novels.

Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

Manumission Letter, 1784, St. John's University Special Collections

Manumission letter written by Joshua Pigman and James Argent of Frederick County State Maryland freeing two slaves, James and Frances, once they turn 21 years old. May 22, 1784.

St. Augustine Hall, 3rd Floor

February 15 – March 15, 2013

Co-curated by Megan Margino and Sharell Walker

The St. John’s University Special Collections presents an exhibition commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Within Special Collections are a variety of primary and secondary documents related to slavery, the Civil War, and the Emancipation Proclamation. Included in this display are reproductions of original documents in Special Collections such as hand-written letters and documents from people such as Vice President Hannibal Hamlin and other notable figures of the era. There are also rare and first edition books that contain unique perspectives on the historical events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation.

These documents are available for research by appointment in the University Archives and Special Collections. To make an appointment, please call (718) 990-1465 or email archives@stjohns.edu.

We have had a recent advisory from JSTOR, but it shouldn’t be too much of a disruption for our JSTOR regulars.  But do note, that if you normally export/email  a number of  articles at a time from JSTOR using  the “save my citations” feature, you will need to adjust during this time-period … you can still export/email articles individually or in bulk by using the “export Citation” link  or “email citation link”

“On Friday, September 9 and Saturday, September 10, JSTOR will be performing site maintenance that requires a “read-only” period for these two days. During this scheduled maintenance, users will be able to search, browse, and access and download PDF files for content in JSTOR. They will not be able to save citations, reset passwords, create or update MyJSTOR accounts, or purchase articles.”

Refworks 2.0 link in upper right corner, next to Home

RefWorks is one of a number of bibliographic management programs that are available to the staunch researcher.  If you are a dedicated RefWorks user, you might want to take a look at the new RefWorks 2.0 interface that launched earlier this week.  The “Classic” interface  will be accessible until the end of the year (so you have an adjustment period), but if you want to review some of the highlights of the new interface, check out this video which highlights the differences between the old and new interfaces.

Also, if you want to play with the new interface before the end of the semester you will see links to access RefWorks 2.0 in the upper, right-hand corner at the log-in stage (pictured left, above)

Additionally, after you are logged in,  there is a link that lets you toggle back and forth between the classic and 2.0 interfaces in the upper, right-hand corner of your account screen (pictured right, below).

Toggle link lets you switch between classic and 2.0 interface

If you are new to RefWorks, you might consider looking into the new interface from the start — this preview video for new users will show you some of the features.

For those who like to learn on their own, but would like some extra help, there are free webinars and tutorials available from RefWorks.

Of course, for those of you who like a hands-on workshop, we offer in-library workshops on RefWorks and Zotero (another, open-source Bibliographic Management system)– among other topics. Register for one today!

Leaf used as a bookmark, CC image courtesy of emrank

"bookmark" CC image courtesy of emrank

In case you haven’t heard the news, this week, two big e-resource-sharing platforms announced changes that may impact (and hopefully improve) your ability to find and share information within the next few months.

About a week ago, Kindle announced that it is finally working with libraries to offer the ability to share/lend books — this is great news, as Kindle was one of the last “holdouts.”  At this point it is working primarily with Overdrive — the main vendor for e-books in public libraries — but we will keep an eye on the efforts to share with academic and special libraries as well.   Using  Kindle would make bookmarking, note-taking and highlighting in a borrowed book easier.

Your notes will not show up when the next patron checks out the book. But if you check out the book again, or subsequently buy it, your notes will be there just as you left them, perfectly Whispersynced

In other “bookmarking” news, Delicious has been saved from the chopping block!  On Wednesday, AVOS announced that they acquired Delicious from Yahoo.  In order to have your account continue to work after June, you need to “opt in” to the transfer of your bookmarks… loads of details on the delicious transition page.

A new report from Sloan-C takes up authentication and academic integrity in the online learning environment.  While most schools are doing well with compliance on authentication, Sloan-C offers some pointers on Academic integrity for online learning (to combat the ‘perception’ of greater cheating in online course).  Note that the principles offer some sound advice for hybrid and face-to-face pedagogy as well.   The blog entry offers summary points and a link to the ” “Best Practice Strategies to Promote Academic Integrity in Online Education”. …[which] reflects exemplary principles and practices from online instructors and administrators from 170 higher education institutions in the United States in five core areas: Institutional Context and Commitment, Curriculum and Instruction, Faculty Support, Student Support, and Assessment and Evaluation.”  Both are worth a peek!

ARTstor began as a database of images of artworks intended primarily for the use of artists and art historians, contributed primarily by art museums. It has since grown to a repository of more than 1,000,000 images covering a wide range of periods, countries, media, and topics. It’s still entirely made up of visual resources – you won’t find journal articles about art or art history, for example – but you will find images of interest to many fields with interesting interdisciplinary applications. Some examples include:

Whether your discipline is listed here or not, take some time to explore ARTstor, it is a fascinating storehouse of unique images and objects just waiting for you to put it to use!

For those of you who are (or become) ARTstor aficionados, you can keep up with ARTstor by reading the ARTstor Blog, signing up for email announcements, becoming an ARTstor fan on Facebook, subscribing to the ARTstor RSS feed, or watching ARTstor how-to videos on YouTube!

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