July 2010


Summer – a time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress.  With this in mind, we have asked some faculty members at St. John’s what they are reading this summer.

Dr. Kathleen Lubey, an Assistant Professor in the English Department,  writes:

Each summer, I look forward to reading novels I’ve been meaning to get to for years, as well as revisiting some old favorites. As soon as classes ended, I re-read J.M. Coetzee’s  Waiting for the Barbarians, a novel set in an unspecified time and place but bearing some resemblance to South Africa, Coetzee’s homeland. It tells the story of a frontier settlement that awaits the military capture of an indigenous people that are perceived to be a threat to the state. Both the reader and narrator soon become aware that the “barbarians” are an imagined category that represents the townspeople’s fear and hatred far more than any real social menace. The book challenges our assumptions about conflicts between ethnic groups, about how power works, and about fiction’s ability to illuminate cultural and political struggle. Next on my list is Philip  Roth’s   American Pastoral, which I’ve been meaning to read for years. Roth’s fiction typically exposes the discontents of lifestyles considered typically “American” — middle-class prosperity, marriage, and professional success. American Pastoral has been described as undertaking these themes most powerfully.

Summer – a time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress.  With this in mind, we have asked some faculty members at St. John’s what they are reading this summer.

Dr. Mauricio Borrero, Associate Professor and Chair of the History Department writes:

This summer I will read Istanbul: Memories and the City by Orhan Pamuk, winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature.  I have long been fascinated by Istanbul, its history, its cultures and its geography: European and Asian, Muslim and Christian, ancient and modern.   

I have only visited Istanbul from the comfort of my armchair, but hope to someday.  Pamuk’s book will bring me that much closer.

Summer – a time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress.  With this in mind, we have asked some faculty members at St. John’s what they are reading this summer.

Dr. Robert Eschenauer, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Services and Counseling and Director of the Counselor Education Program, writes:

One book I will be reading this summer is Dr. Daniel Siegel‘s The Mindful Therapist. I am always looking for ways to improve the ways that I do and teach psychotherapy.  In addition I have an interest in neuroscience.  This book has been acclaimed as synthesizing both psychotherapy and neuroscience into a scholarly, scientifically grounded and evidenced-based approach.  I cannot afford to ignore such a text and so I will be looking for the wisdom that it presents with the expectation that it will enlighten both my teaching and professional practice.

 

Summer – a time for catching up, relaxing, exploring, starting new projects, or perhaps completing work in progress.  With this in mind, we have asked some faculty members at St. John’s what they are reading this summer.

Dr. George McCartney, Professor of English in the university’s  College of Professional Studies, writes:

I am reading Beet by Roger Rosenblatt this summer. Having gotten through the first two-thirds of this novel, I can testify unflinchingly that anyone who has attended, is attending, or will attend college and anyone else who has had or may have the doubtful pleasure of knowing anyone who has in any way been involved with college education must read this book as soon as possible. It tells the awful truth about higher education as it is peculiarly practiced in the United States today. But take preventive caution before opening the book. Rosenblatt, like his master Evelyn Waugh, has the rare and enviable talent of making one laugh loudly while reading. Accordingly, you should read his novel in the relative privacy of the most sound-insulated room in your home to avoid offending your family and neighbors who otherwise will doubtlessly think your noisy mirth a rude comment on whatever lesser tasks they happen to be undertaking 

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