Graphic of keyboard with keys spelling out PRIVACY

CC Photo courtesy of g4ll4is on Flickr

The recent EU court’s ruling on the “right to be forgotten” is an interesting wrinkle in the debates around privacy and public information in the world of cyber-connection.  Even those who have carefully guarded what information they have “put out there” can find that information related to their name or face exists online and can be mined and redistributed in any number of ways.   While the EU  just forced  Google to institute a procedure for removing items from the “results” for searches originating in Europe (Google.fr and google.de), they were not forced to delete those items from their “repositiory” of sites.  Those who were hoping to  have the request option for the US version of Google are out of luck; no court has forced Google to do this for US yet.   However, if you want to clean up your “international image”, Jill Scharr’s helpful blog entry has more info on doing that.

Google does offer a procedure to remove “outdated” content. It may take some following-up with them (as the page suggests, since I guess they can take their time and/or refuse).  You will also need to do this in conjunction with the webmaster of your site (if you are not your own webmaster).

In the short-run, you can delete passages or pages on your site; however, since they were indexed by Google shortly after you “published” them, they would still show up in a google search.  The old/deleted materials will  “sink down” in the search-results as more people click on your more recent materials.   Your best bet in the interim, is to make old content “private”, and use either text-links to let people know that there is a more current page with a link to new info and/or implement a  re-direct URL to the now-current information….an inelegant solution until the google request is acknowledged, but a quick and dirty solution for the time-being.

For more information on privacy and security in relationship to your “online presence” check out our Info Ethics LibGuide

piketty

Thomas Piketty, in his book Capital in the Twenty-First Century, argues that extreme economic inequality in the current global economic system is undermining democratic values.  This book has gotten a lot of press coverage recently in such publications as The Guardian, The New Statesman, and the New York Review of Books, where Paul Krugman had a lengthy review. The New York Times referred to Piketty as the “latest overnight intellectual sensation,” following in the footsteps of public intellectuals such as Susan Sontag, Christopher Lasch, and Francis Fukuyama.

We thought we’d let our readers know that Capital in the Twenty-First Century is available as an e-book to members of the St. John’s University community.

 

Gempesaw_Bobby

 The University Libraries welcome St. John’s University’s new president Dr. Conrado M. Gempesaw.  We thought our readers might be interested in Dr. Gempesaw’s scholarly writing.  Please check this site for links to many of his articles.

Catholicism in East Asia photoExhibit on view through May 2, 2014

Chin Ying Asian Library, Sun Yat Sen Memorial Hall

Curated by Anastasia Chiu

The Chin Ying Asian Library possesses a significant collection of works chronicling the advent and development of the Catholic Church’s presence and establishment in East Asia to support St. John’s University’s core curriculum and scholarship. This installation of the Asian Collection Highlights Exhibit presents selections from the rich multilingual resources on Catholicism in the Asian Library’s collection, and includes a list of further suggested titles to encourage usage and perusal by students and researchers in St. John’s’ academic community.

Items on display may be removed from the display case upon request and perused in-library or checked out.

The 2013 Digital Humanities awards came out relatively recently, offering an array of amazing projects to peruse — some public, some academic, all worth a gander.  It is worth highlighting that the best InfoGraphic award covered statistics on why “Humanities Matter” [PDF]  — making the infographic a meta-DH project of sorts.

As a follow-up to the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities’ “Quantifying Digital Humanities” infographic from 2012 (PDF), The Humanities Matter! starts a more expansive effort by the Center and 4Humanities to gather statistics and create infographics about the humanities. The Humanities Matter! is part of the 4Humanities Humanities Infographics initiative, including Infographics Friday online posts.

Another DH-for-fun award went to Serendip-o-matic — which acts as a federated-serendipitous-search engine:  insert a block of text, and the applet finds related images culled from the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and Europeana digital Libraries.

If you are curious about Digital Humanities at St. John’s, the next CTL Interdisciplinary Roundtable discussion will focus on Digital Humanities, on Monday April 7th; where Jen Travis will facilitate discussions about “projects and pedagogies of this emerging field.”  If you are interested in learning more about creating infographics, or using them as an alternative research project, the University Libraries are hosting an edutech workshop on infographics on Wed. April 2nd.  Does unearthing the treasures of the DPLA sound appealing?  Does making your own a mash-up of the DPLA resource-data sound sound intriguing ?  If so, join us Wednesday, April 9th, for a workshop on DPLA and engage with new treasure trove of primary resources and the meta-data that makes it tick!

women writers exhibit books imageExhibit on view through April 4, 2014

Chin Ying Asian Library, Sun Yat Sen Memorial Hall

Curated by Anastasia Chiu

To mark Women’s History Month, the Asian Collection Highlights exhibit is showcasing literature anthologies of works by woman writers in East Asia. Covering multiple genres of literature from 1600 through the 1990’s, the anthologies in this exhibit are a small sample of the wealth of works in the Chin Ying Asian Library that observe and analyze the growth and development of women’s voices and representation in the modern international context.

As with all Asian Collection Highlights exhibits, items on display may be removed from the display case upon request and perused in-library or checked out. Previous installations of the Asian Collection Highlights Exhibit have included: Literary Classics and Visual Arts in Japan, the Wang Guanying Gift, the Soong Sisters (for the 2013 observance of Women’s History Month), and Buddhist Art in East Asia.

An Exhibition of Botanical Specimens from the Mary Garden at St. John’s
February 13 – March 5, 2014
St. Augustine Hall 4th Floor
St. John’s University

Sacred Botany; Seed, Leaf, Flower in the Healing ArtsHidden within the pages of illuminated manuscripts, books of hours and breviaries, intricately illustrated botanical specimens have formed an integral part of medieval manuscripts and religious iconography and later, the Renaissance aesthetics. They illustrate botanical symbolism and its Christian orientation and enhance the visual beauty of a work on paper.

For Mariology students (THEO 3215) of Prof. Andrea Florendo as cross-curricular Mary Gardeners, they constitute intriguing footnotes to the larger but related subjects of art, botany & theology. Their Academic Service- Learning and participation in Learning Communities events lead in part to artistic documentation and record-keeping of botanical specimens from the Mary Garden at St. John’s habitat, and preserved in a herbarium at St. Albert’s Hall for research purposes. Several works from the Library’s Special Collections showcase images of plants that are used to sustain not only the body, but the mind and spirit as well.

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